Leveling up - Simple steps to optimize the Critical Rendering Path

In May, 2015 I published an article on AirPair, about the Critical Rendering Path and how to optimize it.

Article Leveling up: Simple steps to optimize the Critical Rendering Path - AirPair

Abstract

Web development is tricky. There is a myriad of goals to strive for, which can be very cumbersome for your page performance, and can spike your Speed Index way up.

The Critical Rendering Path (or CRP) is the sequence of steps the browser takes to render the critical content of a webpage. This article explains about simple steps on how to optimize your page’s Critical Rendering Path in order to achieve better performance.

Web Components 101

Over the past few years a lot of people have been trying to rethink the way the web can/should be used. Currently, front-end developers find themselves in the often-frustrating situation of having to build complex websites with HTML–which can often be a fairly blunt tool–on top of the clunky foundations of Jurassic-age web browser limitations.

On this post at Medium, originally made for Avenue Code‘s Code Highway blog, I answer the million-dollar question: is it possible to abstract low-level constructs of HTML to define high-level semantic components? And the answer is yes!

What is all the fuss about with front-end development?

Many enterprise software developers still wonder why everyone is so concerned with client-side applications, HTML 5, Javascript, and front-end related “stuff.” Such skills are very notable on job postings nowadays, even for enterprise development based on Java, .NET, and Rails (which are server-side technologies). A developer might ask: Why does nobody seem to care anymore that I have a Java architect certification if I don’t know about RequireJS, AngularJS or whateverJS (front-end development tools)?

On this post at Medium, originally made for Avenue Code‘s Code Highway blog, I give an overview about what is going on with front-end development and why is it given so much importance over the past couple of years.